You Should Use Passphrases, Not Passwords

We’ve talked a lot about security plugins and ways to make sure your site is secure, but we haven’t talked much about passwords and more so how you should be using longer, complex passphrases, rather than short passwords. In this video, Edward Snowden explains why you should use passphrases in a way all your friends and family can understand.

Snowden famously leaked key details about the NSA’s mass surveillance, so he knows a thing or two about what makes a system secure or not.

The Top 25 most used passwords

In perhaps the most notable change, this being the first year that anything other than “password” has secured the top spot, we offer a well-deserved congratulations to “123456.” Other new additions include alternate keyboard layout “azerty” and the ever-mysterious “000000.” Think your password’s better? Show us down below! (Kidding. Please don’t do that. Unless your password’s “princess”—in which case, yeah, we know.)

1. 123456 (Up 1)
2.
password (Down 1)
3.
12345678 (Unchanged)
4.
qwerty (Up 1)
5.
abc123 (Down 1)
6.
123456789 (New)
7.
111111 (Up 2)
8.
1234567 (Up 5)
9.
iloveyou (Up 2)
10.
adobe123 (New)
11.
123123 (Up 5)
12. Admin
(New)
13.
1234567890 (New)
14.
letmein (Down 7)
15.
photoshop (New)
16.
1234 (New)
17.
monkey (Down 11)
18.
shadow (Unchanged)
19.
sunshine (Down 5)
20.
12345 (New)
21.
password1 (Up 4)
22.
princess (New)
23.
azerty (New)
24.
trustno1 (Down 12)
25.
000000 (New)

The best password is one even you don’t know, which is why still recommend augmenting your security strategy with a password manager. However, for the passwords you do have to remember, long pass phrases—that aren’t common, well-known phrases that are likely to be in a dictionary—are the way to go.

common-passwords-to-avoid

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