Using the Advanced Font typography in Office

Using the Advanced Font typography in Office

Fonts help your documents pop and stand out and can be easier to read, Office 2010 helps you take your fonts to the next level with support for OpenType ligatures and stylistic sets. This week we will look at how you can play with Advanced Font typography features in Word but it works in most of Office (makes your writing pretty) Office 2010 includes the new font Gabriola, which includes an incredible number of beautiful stylistic sets and ligatures, and Office 2010 including support for OpenType ligatures, stylistic sets, number forms, contextual alternative characters, and more.  These features are available in Word, Outlook, and Publisher 2010, and work the same on Windows XP, Vista and Windows 7. Windows has several OpenType fonts this are Calibri, Cambria, Constantia, and Corbel all include multiple number forms, while Consolas, Palatino Linotype, and Gabriola are just on Windows 7 only Using the new advanced typography in Word 2010 Heres how you do it, open a new document, select an OpenType font, type in some text (in this case I am using the =rand(1) to generate a paragraph of random text to show you).  Click the arrow on the bottom of the Font section of the ribbon to open the font properties. Now go to the advanced tab to see the OpenType features. You can change the ligatures setting (printing a character or piece of type that consists of two or more letters joined together, e.g. ‘æ’) Choose Proportional or Tabular number spacing… And even select Lining or Old-style number forms. Here’s a comparison of Lining and Old-style  for numbers in Word 2010 with the...
5 really great formulas to save time in Excel

5 really great formulas to save time in Excel

This Week I thought I would do 5 really great formulas that will save you time. So here we go Excel formulas you should definitely know:- 1. SUM The formula looks like this: =SUM(5, 5) or =SUM(A1, B1) or =SUM(A1:B5) The SUM formula does exactly what it says on the tin, allowing you to add 2 or more numbers together or even cell references if you use those lots. The different examples above take you through the options, you can have normal numbers in there separated by commas and it will add them together for you, you can have cell references and as long as there are numbers in those cells it will add them together for you as well, or you can have a range of cells with a colon : in between the 2 cells, and it will add the numbers in all the cells in the range, for example =SUM(A1:B5) 2. COUNT The formula looks like this: =COUNT(A1:A10) This formula is great it counts the number of cells in a range that have numbers in them yes you heard correct only those cell with numbers though. If you want to count other cells check out number 3. 3. COUNTA The formula looks like this: =COUNTA(A1:A10) Now this formula counts the number of non-empty cells in a range. So It will count cells that have numbers and/or any other characters in them the “COUNTA” formula works with all types of data. 4. LEN The formula looks like this: =LEN(A1) Ok with the two above we have counted ranges of cell to see how many is there using...